NOTE! This site uses cookies and similar technologies.

If you do not change browser settings, you agree to it. Learn more

I understand

The EU cookie law (e-Privacy Directive)

The law which applies to how you use cookies and similar technologies for storing information on a user’s equipment such as their computer or mobile device changed on 26 May 2011.

Please visit ICO website for more information. http://ico.org.uk/

Telcos positioned for new frontiers with OpenStack

E.G.Nadhan Issue: Europe II 2016
Article no.: 14
Topic: Telcos positioned for new frontiers with OpenStack
Author: E.G.Nadhan
Title: Chief Technology Strategist
Organisation: Red Hat
PDF size: 386KB

About author

With over 25 years of experience in the IT industry selling, delivering and managing enterprise solutions for global enterprises, E.G.Nadhan is the Chief Technology Strategist at Red Hat working with the executive leadership of enterprises to innovatively drive Cloud Transformation with Open Source technologies and DevOps. Nadhan also provides thought leadership on various concepts including Big Data, Analytics and the Internet of Things (IoT). Prior to joining Red Hat, Nadhan was an HP Thought Leader and the Global Leader for the Culture of Innovation where he worked with the executive leadership of strategic accounts to realize innovative ideas that address key business challenges for customers. As the Co-Chair for multiple projects within the Cloud Work Group, Nadhan led the publication of the first Cloud Computing Technical Standard and leads the Cloud Governance project within The Open Group. He is a recognized author/speaker at industry conferences and has co-authored multiple books.

Article abstract

The transition to open source is really triggered by a slow but steady shift from hardware to software. The transition to the software-defined world is easier in the Management Control Planes than the Data plane but much work is in progress to solve some of those ongoing technology and business challenges. There is also an overriding concern about rocking the foundation of these massive and rapidly growing networks when you start thinking about changing the Data plane. 

Full Article

Telcos have gone mainstream with OpenStack. This message was loud and clear at the OpenStack summit where Verizon and AT&T shared their respective OpenStack implementations during their keynotes with significant presence from several other industry players including Huawei, Ericsson, China Mobile, Comcast, TimeWarner Cable, and Swisscom. Earlier this year, Huawei and Ericsson announced similar moves into Cloud and Open Source at the Mobile World Congress. Is a tectonic shift around the corner for the Telco industry at large? “Not so fast”, cautions my good friend, Ian Hood, Global Chief Architect for our service provider partners at Red Hat. This shift, albeit a long time coming, steers Telcos in a new direction. However, the specific movements would vary by the enterprises themselves depending upon various factors including their cultural mindsets as well as the architectural layers impacted. At the same time, Telcos can draw nuggets of wisdom from the experience the IT industry has had in the Cloud leading to increased levels of automation. All in all, these announcements do position the Telco industry to reach for new frontiers hitherto unforeseen.

May the Open Force of the Cloud be with them!

Culture

Culture has a lot to do with driving change across the service provider community who usually have one of these prevailing mindsets:

• Conservative. This mindset represents those that are taking comfort from the stability of their traditional, proprietary, hardware-centric environment. As the rapidly evolving market forces mandate faster agility with increased network traffic volumes, these service providers may be severely challenged to keep up with the rising demand.
• Assertive. The assertive service provider of today was conservative yesterday. This group appreciates that they are late to the game but do tread new ground, illustrated by the cautious adoption of open source by some of these providers [can’t imply that they all have done so unless we have data to back it up] across their SP network infrastructures.
• Aggressive. Say hello to the avant-garde mindset representing those service providers who take pride in being the torch bearers of adopting the next “cool” technology.

Architecture

Architecturally, the Service Provider network infrastructure spans three planes as defined below:
• Management. Setup, provision and configure network elements and services.
• Control. Signal state of calls and network connections while automating recovery from faults.
• Data. Actual end-user data or traffic that flows through the networks regardless of how end customers connect.

The transition to open source is really triggered by a slow but steady shift from hardware to software. The transition to the software-defined world is easier in the Management Control Planes than the Data plane but much work is in progress to solve some of those ongoing technology and business challenges. There is also an overriding concern about rocking the foundation of these massive and rapidly growing networks when you start thinking about changing the Data plane.

Automation

Automation in the Telco industry is “somewhere between the Swivel Chair and the Fax Machine with a smattering of worksheets along the way”, quips Ian. The Telco industry is today where Enterprise IT was years ago managing data center operations with very low Operator to Server ratios. Forces of Cloud, Big Data and Mobility have driven the need for systemic virtualization and automation in this domain resulting in a significantly higher Operator to Server ratios.

. Now that Telcos have started “living” in the OpenStack, they are more likely to take a few cues from the open world of the Cloud.

Perhaps, it is no coincidence that OpenConfig has the goal of moving networks toward a more dynamic, programmable infrastructure by adopting software-defined networking principles such as declarative configuration and model-driven management and operations. There is a clear move by this group towards vendor-neutral data models for configuration and management that will be supported natively on networking hardware and software platforms.

So, what are some of the candidates for effective automation?

1. Automating service provisioning using standardized models. Standardized models of the service intent that help to automate service provisioning for remotely configuring secure devices installed at different locations connected with each other.
2. Generate self-configured customer-specific services. Customer specifies their service requirements on a self-service portal which are used to automatically generate self-configured services tailored to the customer needs.
3. Automate Capacity Management. Monitor the uptime and availability of devices and services while ensuring the consumption patterns align with what the customer said they will pay for. Are the customers using what they paid for? Provisioning additional resources to increase the network, storage, and compute capacities.
4. Applying Predictive Analytics to Self-Configuring networks. Apply analytics to identify and project the next potential outage while automating preventive measures.

All that said, will the Telco industry ever get to being 100% automated? “Not any time soon”, says Ian. There are several activities during the initial phase where the infrastructure is being built that can never be automated - including streets being physically dug up, the build out of fibre and radio transmission facilities before being able to let traffic flow over it.

There you have it.

There are multiple variables that can impact the future direction of Telcos. Forward thinking Telcos will make the right shift at the right time.

What about the other Telcos you ask? Let us leave that in the good hands of the OpenStack community.


Last modified onTuesday, 28 February 2017 15:34
More in this category: The network is sexy again »
Login to post comments
Bingo sites http://gbetting.co.uk/bingo with sign up bonuses