Home Page ContentMediaMedia Pack Africa and the Middle East II 2022 media pack

Africa and the Middle East II 2022 media pack

by david.nunes

The AME Media Pack describes the next edition of the magazine including: the overarching theme, contributors to date in name order, and the ICT event[s] at which, because we are one of the official media partners, the magazine will be freely distributed.

The Africa & Middle East editions of the magazine concentrate on discussing the impact of ICT on countries and emerging markets in the region.

Past editions have extensively treated important issues such as the ‘digital divide’ in AME, that is the gap between those connected, and those not connected, to modern mass communications.

Further, how ICT is impacting the development of national and regional economies.  The magazine has also treated the role of ICT in disaster management.

Theme: The Role of ICT in Fostering Economic Development

To generate economic growth that leads to sustainable development, Africa must shift its focus to retaining and creating
wealth, better managing its resources, fostering inclusiveness, moving up on global value chains, diversifying its economies, optimizing the energy mix, and placing human capital at the centre of policymaking. For this to happen,
African policy must foster investment in research, development, and innovation (R&D&I) to reboot the continent’s economic structures and catch up technologically with the rest of the world. Innovation, and the digital
information technology that accompanies it, has become a necessary component of any effort to address such challenges as food security, education, health, energy, and competitiveness. The world is driven by innovation: unless African
policymakers reap the potential benefits of R&D&I, the global divide will keep growing. The problem is that innovation is talked about and debated, but not strategized.

 It is here, paradoxically, that the COVID-19 pandemic, despite all the economic and social devastation it has caused,
provides an opportunity for African countries to innovate and go digital. African countries will have to rebuild their economies. They should not merely repair them; they should remake them, with digitalization leading the way.

 So far, civil societies seem to be more ready than policymakers to embrace digital technology. With no help from government, the digital technology industry has grown in Africa—through incubators and
start-ups, tech hubs and data centres. Information and communication technology (ICT) activities are spreading across the continent, and young Africans are responding with digital technology to the challenges posed by COVID-19. For
example, at an ICT hub in Kenya, FabLab created Msafari, a people-tracking application that can trace the spread of infections. A similar application, Wiqaytna6, was developed in Morocco. In Rwanda, the government is demonstrating
what enlightened policies can achieve. The country has invested heavily in digital infrastructure—90 percent of the country has access to broadband internet, and 75 percent of the population has cell phones. Early in the pandemic Rwanda parlayed that technological prowess into developing real-time digital mapping to track the spread of COVID-19, expanded telemedicine to reduce visits to clinics, and created chatbots to update people on the disease.

These are promising endeavours, but digitalization is not widespread in Africa. Rwanda is the exception. Only 28 percent of
Africans use the internet, a digital divide that prevents the continent from taking full advantage of digital technology’s ability to mitigate some of the worst effects of the pandemic.

 That slow spread of internet technology also makes it difficult for the continent to leapfrog obstacles to sustainable
development. To generate transformative growth, digitalization cannot be left mainly to civil society and the private sector. The socioeconomic divide in Africa feeds the digital divide, and vice versa. Digitalization needs to be
scaled up forcefully by policymakers to unlock structural transformation. Discuss


Distribution Total copies: 22,854
  • Gitex, Dubai, 10-14 October 2022
Job title breakdown
Public sector Private sector
Government ministers
Under ministers
Regulators
Senior civil servants
State ministers
Presidents
Chief executive officers
Directors
Finance directors
Regional directors
 
Organisational breakdown
Network Operators
Ministries of Communications and advisers
Regulatory authorities and advisers
Manufacturers
Service providers
Major corporations in the region
Global telcos
Multinational corporations
 
Geographical breakdown

Algeria

Angola

Bahrain

Benin

Botswana

Burkina Faso

Burundi

Cameroon

Cape Verde

Central African Republic

Chad

Comoros

Congo-Brazzaville

Congo, Democratic Republic

Côte d’Ivoire

Djibouti

Egypt

Equatorial Guinea

Eritrea

Ethiopia

Gabon

Gambia

Ghana

Guinea

Guinea-Bissau

Iran

Iraq

Israel

Jordan

Kenya

Kuwait

Lebanon

Lesotho

Liberia

Libya

Madagascar

Malawi

Mali

Mauritania

Mauritius

Morocco

Mozambique

Namibia

Niger

Nigeria

Oman

Palestine

Qatar

Rwanda

Sao Tome & Principe

Saudi Arabia

Senegal

Seychelles

Sierra Leone

Somalia

South Africa

Sudan

South Sudan

Swaziland

Syria

Tanzania

Togo

Tunisia

Turkey

UAE

Uganda

Yemen

Zambia

Zimbabwe

How is ICT helping AME countries recover from
COVID 19?

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