Home Global-ICTGlobal-ICT 2004 THE WAY FORWARD – ICTs AND THE DEVELOPING WORLD

THE WAY FORWARD – ICTs AND THE DEVELOPING WORLD

by david.nunes
Sammy KiruiIssue:Global-ICT 2004
Article no.:9
Topic:THE WAY FORWARD – ICTs AND THE DEVELOPING WORLD
Author:Sammy Kirui
Title:Director-General
Organisation:Communications Commission of Kenya
PDF size:160KB

About author

Mr. Sammy K. Kirui is the Director-General and CEO of the Communications Commission of Kenya. Prior to this appointment, Mr. Kirui was Principal Counsel at Kirui and Associates Advocates, a legal firm specialised in commercial and international law. He has also served as Head of the Legal Division, Ministry of Foreign Affairs and International Cooperation and as First Secretary/Legal Advisor at the Kenya Embassy in Washington D.C. He joined the Civil Service in 1989, after a stint at Shah & Parekh Advocates, and was posted to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and International Cooperation as a state counsel. He was involved with the Preferential Trade Area (now COMESA) as a legal advisor and negotiator. Mr. Kirui was a member of the Taskforce on Legal Issues relating to HIV/Aids. A qualified lawyer and Certified Public Secretary (CPS-K), Mr. Kirui has practised law and diplomacy for close to 15 years.

Article abstract

The United Nations Millennium Summit adopted eight Millennium Development Goals as a benchmark for measuring global development. In Kenya, ICTs play an important role in the efforts to meet these goals, bringing more efficient methods of production, access to new markets, improved government services, and increased access to basic social goods and services. Kenya is developing programs, with private sector support, using ICTs to further their efforts to eradicate extreme poverty, greatly improve health care, and provide universal primary education.

Full Article

During the past decade, the international community has increased its focus on strategies to help the people of the world’s developing countries share in the benefits of globalisation and escape the traps of poverty. At the United Nations Millennium Summit in September 2000, a decision was made to adopt eight specific Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), thus providing a common benchmark for measuring progress of global development.

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